The big trip

Where have you been riding? Tell us all about your trip. Prove it with pictures! If ya didn't take pictures, it didn't happen...
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Fran
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Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Tue Apr 07, 2020 6:05 pm

Manscout the short answer is no. I can't get the outside bolt off it needs an airgun. I think the connecting rod between the bolts is probably bent. The plan is to try to get some washers/shims on the inside of the mount. I can get the inside bolt off and then I will try to slip in some washers into the gap between the swing arm and the frame. Badly described I know, there is a video on utube showing what I am going to try. That's where I got the idea. You and all the family stay safe.

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Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Tue Apr 14, 2020 3:57 pm

Presently we are shut down in Peru. The country is closed until at least April 26st. We are in Ica in a nice hotel with a pool and just 2 other guests. There is a nightly curfew 8pm to 5am and no intercity travel, you are allowed to do essential things during the day groceries, medical etc. In the present situation what there are doing here makes a lot of countries look like they are in denial. So no complaints here apart from no more alcohol sales. Clean living what a novelty.

Back to the narrative now. After Cali it was off to a little village called Sylvia where they have a famous market on a Tuesday. We arrived on Monday afternoon and after settling in to the room headed into town for lunch. Most of the population was indigenous and we quickly noticed a lot of men asleep at the plaza. We couldn’t figure it out, were they tired and shagged out after a long squawk? The hotel owner explained it to us, Sunday was an election day and no booze had been sold for a couple of days before. The local men were celebrating the results, regretting the results or just getting pi$$ed. It was strange to say the least lots of people asleep, others in deep philosophical discussions about what I sure the participants didn’t know or care. The man at the other table in the coffee shop woke up fell off his chair, got up, dusted himself off and promptly fell asleep on the chair again. All in perfect silence, quite surreal. It was all so low key no aggression, no drunken shouting, no disapproving looks just another day really.

The market was fantastic everybody from miles around comes. Nearly all the people were in their traditional costumes, but to them it is just their normal clothes. I think the only thing not for sale was cars. Stalls had produce we had no idea what it was, did you eat it, was it medicinal? We didn’t have a clue. That’s what makes travel so interesting all the things you don’t know.

After checking out the market for a few hours and acting like tourists we took the bike further up the valley. It was beautiful but obviously a hard life trying to make a living. The fields were steep and all work had to be done by hand. The highlight of the drive was meeting a bunch of 9 or 10 year olds with their teacher. Photos were taken, explanations attempted. Few words, much pantomime and some laughs, with us not at us we hope. After that Sylvia had given up all its attractions and it was time to move on.

Next stop Popayan another colonial town. We had a great hotel in the center of town again a converted convent. It is called the white city I think this is cuidad blanco number 3 or 4 on the trip. Halloween is very big in Columbia for some reason. The plaza was blocked off and began to fill up with costumed revelers, by 5pm it was packed. Every super hero was there from Bolivar to Batman and many we are too old to recognize. The atmosphere was great everyone was enjoying themselves it a real family fun outing. There was no trick or treating but the street food vendors were doing a roaring trade. What an unexpected and fun evening. Street life and local festivals are always the best treats. There are a lot of festivals and parades all through Latin America and we never tire of them.

We had been contacted by a member of the Whats app moto support group to join them on Sunday when their moto club was going to a local village to bring some Halloween cheer to the kids. It turned out to be one of the best experiences of the whole 2.5 year trip.

They picked us up at the hotel and escorted us through town where more bikes joined us. The village was about 5 houses on a curve 15 k down a gravel road. There was a half size soccer field that was the party site. At first it was just us, the other club members and a few locals, slowly more and more kids and parents arrived. Then an army truck and the police showed up with a bouncy castle. Games were organized, costumes donned, a soldier painted faces and the party took off. Our main contribution was giving rides to all. I did over 2k’s going around the field which was about 50m x 20m. I have no idea how many rides I gave but everyone got at least one. One little 4 year old bombero (fireman) took a lot of persuading to get in but then wouldn’t get out of the car. I did a few circuits in reverse to vary up things, reverse was not what was expected from a moto. Pferdi must feature in so many photos and videos he needs an agent. What an amazing day we had, we have been very lucky to have so many great times but if we had to pick one I think this would be it. At the end of the party all the candy was given out and the swapping began. Then we reluctantly had to return to the hotel and draw an end to a perfect day. I am sitting here with a big smile just thinking about it. Thank you Popayan moto club for including us.

Continuing south on 25, Pasto was the next port of call. I can’t really remember it except the hotel had good parking but dark. Also there was a lack of restaurants for some reason in near the plaza. We had only stopped there as there is a lake and volcano nearby. To paraphrase someone it was off to see the volcano. Higher and colder and then it started to rain but we intrepidly we plugged on. Around a corner suddenly we were in clouds and colder rain, we are hard core so on we went. After a few more K’s we realized even if we standing on top of the bloody thing we couldn’t have seen it in the fog. Talk about going from hard core to stupid in seconds.

Laguna de la Cocha is a large body of water surrounded by land. As it was off season and cold we were the only people there. It is a big tourist spot with boat trips and fish restaurants. It has a few little canals with houses alongside them. They refer to is as Little Venice which I suppose it could be. If big Venice consisted of no more than a few small canals with some wooden houses, small fish restaurants and was located in the mountains with volcanos nearby the comparison would be apt.

Volcano unseen, a body of water surrounded by land visited and so the bucket list shrinks. Ipales, with the church over the canyon and more importantly the Ecuador border was the last town in Columbia. Again it had a shortage of restaurants, so we had to go up market and out of the concina economica circuit we had called dining for so long.

The church is a must see and just outside of town. It is built into the side of a canyon on the sight of a religious vision. Apparently a local women was struggling home through a storm along the canyon when her daughter who was deaf and dumb said look at the beautiful women. Naturally the Mum was quite surprised to hear this as a) the child was deaf and dumb and b) who would expect a beautiful women at the bottom of a canyon in a storm. It must be a miracle said the local priest when he was told, we must build a Church on the spot. Good idea said the local tourist board as they didn’t want to waste a miracle. So there has been a series of Churches on the site for about the last 400 years. I have to say the setting is spectacular. The latest one is built of a combination of black and white stone with a bridge over the canyon. The canyon is about 300 feet deep and the church is about half way up. It was certainly worth the 15 mins it took to get there.

The plan to cross the border had to be modified as the place we had booked in Ecuador told us that the road to them was closing at 10 in the morning until 5pm. To ensure getting there in time we planned to be the border at 4.30am. The only people ahead of us on the Colombian side were a few Venezuelan refuges, not as many as couple of months ago but another reminder how lucky we have been in life.

The Colombian side went smoothly and we were done in about 45 mins. Now across the bridge and hope they let us in to Ecuador. As we pulled up at the parking area a soldier came over hopped up on Pferdi and wanted a picture. Yvonne was almost at immigration at this stage and yelling at me to hurry up. My photography skills were not up to standard and it took a number of tries before he was happy. At least in return we knew the bike would be well looked after. As usual we got in easily enough and then it was time for Pferdi’s paperwork. Only one person ahead of us so it was looking good then a second person showed up to work 2 windows and only 2 applicants, piece of cake we thought. It did take the new arrival a while to settle in nails, make up, hair, gossip, and text messages later it was time to fire up the work day. You have to have pictures of the bike which we had, but they didn’t count as there were not in the customs parking lot. More photos just like the previous one but we had been told to take these, so now they were official.

By 6am we were done and on the road, unfortunately we missed the famous cemetery on the border which is full of topiary but not open this early. That one stays on the bucket list. We made it to Ibarra with time to spare. The reason for the road closure was a horse race was taking place that afternoon. It had been cancelled because of the social unrest earlier in the summer.

The place is run by a German ex-marine engineer so we had sausages for breakfast w@$#ed down with a beer and then it was time for a siesta, we had been up since 3.30am. Another bike traveler there was an engineer from Portugal. We whiled away the afternoon with him watching the races. They were held on a car race track across the road from the hostel and are a little different. Last years winner is sent of first and then all the rest chase him and try to grab the trophy off him. It definitely was dangerous as up to 40 riders maneuver for position and they were some casualties both equine and human. After about 6 or 7 races it was over for another year and it was time for the fiesta to start.

The next day an Australian arrived; Paddy had left his bike in storage at the hostel and gone home to work so he could continue the trip later. This is way more common than we realized, many people do it in stages like this. His KLR wouldn’t start after being in storage, as he admitted to zero mechanical knowledge (which was an understatement) Henrique and I helped him. We did the work and at the same time tried to teach him the basics 1st battery low but not flat, connections a little corroded again not too bad. Finally we agreed it had to be the starter relay. After an online search this was confirmed as the most likely culprit. Simple fix, but only if one can be found. The dealer in Lima said no problem we will have it in 6 weeks if you order today and 6 to 8 weeks to ship from overseas these were not viable options. Henrique went to every auto parts store in Ibarra and finally tracked one down. It took him 5 hours of searching. I was at the supermarket when he got back and when I pulled into the hostel I couldn’t believe it, I could hear a KLR idling. What a great feeling and boast to your confidence to properly diagnose and fix the problem. Needless to say a bit of a celebration followed courtesy of Paddy.

Paddy solved his lack of skills problem by teaming up with Henrique. They called themselves "the relay team" They stayed together until Ushuaia when Paddy did an Antarctic cruise and Henrique headed north to go home to Portugal.

On the way to Quito we crossed the Equator, there were no signs, lines on the road, bells, whistles or flags so we completely missed it. In the US this would be a major commercial opportunity, here nothing. It is a different culture.

Quito is at 3000m so was cold, grey and damp with crappy traffic. Just another big city, it has a well known historic center. It was ok but not anything we had not seen before. We are getting a bit jaded, big cities are very similar down here. Quito had the novelty of being cold and wet but that doesn’t go in the brochure.

The official equator monument is located just north of Quito. A visit there was a must and we did what everyone does straddle the line and then what else can you do? Only afterwards did we find out that there is a dispute if the official monument is in the right place. Oh well we know we crossed it somewhere.

Off to Monpiche a beach village on the north western coast. The road to there was beautiful through mountains and jungle and then turn north at the coast. When we were having lunch some body starting pointing at Pferdi. This happens all the time so we payed no attention. Actually he was pointing out to us the rear tire was flat. First puncture in 43000 k's luckily there was a small puncture repair place across the road. I took the rear off and when I was putting the spare on they popped the tire off and replaced the tube. I had left LA with that spare and finally got to use it in Ecuador. The old one was beyond repair with a split about 6 inches long. The whole thing took less than 40 minutes and the bill was $3 with a $2 tip they made out like bandits and we were happy too.

Monpiche is a man bun surf spot and after a couple of days it got old. Time to make new plans.

We decided to stop for a while, road weariness had set in again. As Robbie Robertson said in The Last Waltz, “the road has killed a lot of people” and we didn’t want to join that group. We found an apartment on the beach near Canoa. All we had to do was head down the coast 180k's. As we stopped for gas a cop car pulled up beside us. Photos, explanations, bike signing and then the sudden realization that we had no pics of all 4 of us. The gas attendent was quickly recruited as the paparazzi. Now we were free to leave.

We spent a glorious 5 weeks in Canoa, it was on a beach which is 8 miles long. One end is a surf spot but the rest is flat and some expats have sand yachts which when the tide is out they race on the beach. Between eating our own food, having a sundowner with the other residents, all expats, time passed too quickly and suddenly it was 12/27 and time to return to Quito and fly to Cabo San Lucas to meet some family for New Years.

Cabo was a bit strange it certainly wasn’t the Mexico we had experienced for a year. It was a great time and the fireworks show they put on was spectacular. All too quickly it was back to normal life.

We had heard about a drive south of Quito called “The Quilotoa Loop”. It is just off the Pan American and goes through a section of mountains close to a number of volcanoes. It is only about 140k’s in total but we still figured on a few days. Our first morning we awoke to the sight of 3 volcanoes we were lucky because at that time of year they are normally clouded in.

The plan was to head to Sigchos about 60k away and stay at a finca nearby. As we pulled up at the plaza looking for a lunch spot a microphone was thrust at us and we, actually Yvonne, were suddenly being interviewed for the local radio news. I have to say it is amazing what you can do with just an I phone and a mike. At times like that you can really see the upside of technology and how it has transformed lives.

Post interview and lunch we found the finca. It was one of the best places we had stayed in so far. Situated at the end of the road in a beautiful green valley within earshot of the river, it reminded me of a Constable landscape. It was that perfect. It had only being open a few months and was run by a young couple and their 3 year old daughter. Actually the jeffe was the daughter who kindly allowed her parents to run it on her behalf.

The food was amazing farm to table and as the table was in the farm it didn’t have far to go. We spent our time either in the garden with Fedirico and Fedirica the two geese or walking. Peaceful and relaxing doesn’t come close to describing how idyllic it was. Who knew that 3 days could be over that fast.

The main objective for most people is the extinct volcano Quilitoa. It is at 4000m and is now a crater lake. It has a small village at the top which is only there to serve the tourist trade. Boy was it cold and the howling wind didn’t help. The hotel was nice but only had heat in the common room. After having dinner there we joined 2 fellow travelers and found a place that was open and ordered jug of hot aguardiente and spiced fruit juice. It is a local version of a hot toddy and very good it was too.
Our fellow travelers decided to skip the hike down to the lake and just leave for the coast. Even the Norwegian thought it was too bloody cold. Our plan was to wear our warmest gear and go for it. We really f..ked up as you descended it go hotter and dustier. At the top it was less than 10c with wind chill and at the bottom 35c. The pathway was steep and sandy and a 300m vertical climb. All that time, discomfort and sweat to see a lake that you could see from the top anyway. Never again.

The only good thing to come out of it was that we decided we needed a reward so we headed back to the finca for 4 days R&R. The loop is in a very traditional section of Ecuador and is only recently getting tourists. Most people dress traditionally and are small farmers. Flocks of goats and sheep and herds of llamas on the road make for an interesting drive. Everyone was very friendly and because I have worked on a farm I made sure not to startle the animals as we passed them. There is no fun trying to herd excited animals.

We had an invitation to visit a couple we met in Canoa at their home in Quenca. Another colonial town with a lot of expats Originally from Texas they had retired there nearly 5 years ago. We really enjoyed our few days with them just doing normal life stuff. We even there in time for Super Bowl. The last one we had seen was in Parrilla, Mexico 2 years ago. What a strange life we lead.

After Quenca it was off to the border and Peru.

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zookster
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Re: The big trip

Post by zookster » Wed Apr 15, 2020 12:11 pm

Excellent update, thanks for that!
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Re: The big trip

Post by Manscout » Wed Apr 15, 2020 12:22 pm

I just about fell out of my chair!!! Katie and I were in Cabo only three days before you! I cannot believe we missed you by that much! My dad paid for us to all go there as a family for Christmas. We really enjoyed it as well.
Thanks for catching us al up on your last adventures of 2019. :)
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Re: The big trip

Post by Mr Wazzock » Wed Apr 15, 2020 2:07 pm

Fab. Had to Google "man bun surf spot". Ah!!! :D
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Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Sat Apr 18, 2020 9:11 pm

We had been in Peru before in the early 2000’s. The plan this time was to spend time in the north as the last time we had done the Nasca, Arequipa and Cusco area. We got to the border early as is our normal modus operandi. We had picked this crossing as both Ecuador and Peru share the same building and we had heard it wasn’t too busy. When we got there it turned out the internet was down and nothing was happening. No predictions about when it might be fixed so all you can do is settle down and wait. Yvonne joined the line and I waited at the bike. Finally after a 2 hour wait all was well again.

As usual all the problems are with Pferdi. We had failed to check him out of Ecuador so it was back up the road. The aduana (customs) building was 3k back the way we had come and on the northside of the highway. Pferdi got sorted quickly, I think we got special treatment. One of the security guards liked the bike and took our paperwork and went to the top of the line and handed it in. Yvonne was a bit worried as we had no clue who this guy was, just go with it was my idea. It is great to be the one who is right and your wife wrong, not a common occurrence.

Back to the border and now we could leave. I always wonder will we get in to the next country. Again no problems with us but again Pferdi was a hiccup. The customs man had to look up the bike on the Ural website and then look at it in person.

I had parked opposite his office but in the meantime someone had parked a car behind us. He was getting a bit more skeptical of us as no bike was in sight. When we got there the car driver was sitting on Pferdi getting his picture taken. He wasn’t letting the owners or a customs officer spoil his photo. He had to be shoed off so number could be checked etc. Reluctantly he gave us the documents but, and this was a first, he brought us to the insurance desk and made sure we bought it.

We never plan to go far into the country on the day we cross the border. You can never know how long it will take and our golden rule is never drive at night. Mancora is the target, another manbun, surfer, backpacker, party village with overpriced cervaza on the coast.

We stayed at a little hotel run by a couple from Siberia. A bit of a change weather wise for them. They got a lot of Russians tourists staying with them who were stunned to see a Ural. It takes a few days to settle in to a new country, new money, phone cards and routes have to be sorted.

The target was decided, Chachapoyas, in the mountains near Kuelape. Coastal Peru is a desert very barren and windy. The amount of trash is stunning plastic everywhere. As I said before plastic doesn’t go away it is just somewhere else. Apart from the trash the road was fantastic we both like deserts and this one was special. Ocean was on the right with the desert reaching down to the high tide mark and the Andes on the left horizon. It was sand all around with only very occasional bits of green. As desolate a spot as we have ever seen.

Piura was the first stop. Not a tourist spot, just another city with narrow streets, crappy traffic and a hard to find hotel with a small but clean room. On our way to get a phone card we passed a hospital with 3 large Iguanas wandering around behind the fence. They had to be a least a meter long and had a serious set of claws. I wouldn’t f*ck with those boys.

We left the next day, a Sunday always the best day to leave a city and the target was Olmos (170) then Jaen (380k) then Chachapoyas (580k). After Olmos it was all mountains so we figured on 3 days. A combination of an early start, good road and the fact that Olmos looked a bit rundown made us decide to continue on. A quick stop for some fruit, water and bickies and we were good for the next 200k.

The roads at least so far were good, it’s still a slow grid up mountains in a fully loaded Ural. About 20k from the top we entered the clouds and it got denser and denser as we got higher. The last 5k or so I couldn’t even see the far side of the road. Y was worried but I kept lying and reassuring her everything is fine. I didn’t believe it and neither did she but what can you do?

We caught up with a dump truck and had to pass him or we would have stalled the bike. He was 7.25m long. (All trucks in Peru have their dimensions on the back.) I have ridden bikes for 50 years and that was easily the most nerve wracking thing I have done. You couldn’t see the front of the truck from the back and where the road went was anybody’s guess. Nobody turns on their lights here for a bit of fog it was a true leap into the lap of the Gods. A couple of lifetimes latter we were passed and the sense of relief was unbelievable.

The mountain we were crossing is the watershed between the coastal area and the Andes. It was a relief to start downhill even though we still couldn’t see sh*t. I only knew we were descending from the engine note, quickly it got steeper and was that a faint lighter spot in the fog? We wouldn’t let ourselves hope at first but suddenly around a corner, blues skies and big smiles.

We had entered the fog in cloud jungle and emerged in desert with tall cacti. What a beautiful sight, It just got better as the road descended to a river which it then followed for until the turn off for Jaen.

It was one of the best roads we have ever been on. Steep mountains on both sides with the river at the bottom and any flat areas planted with rice which is a verdant green. The contrast between that and the barren mountain sides was amazing. For the 3 hours it took to our jaws were dropped with the beauty of it all.

Jaen is the first major town south of one of the border crossings and so has all the issues of a border town even though it is not right on the border. We had been warned to be careful by the Peru MAI. It was only an overnight stop and we found a place with safe parking and internet. Unfortunately the only restaurants were at the plaza and the desk insisted on us getting a tuc tuc. After dinner it was back to the hotel for a warm beer and bed.

Another early start and no coffee at the desk. It didn’t matter as the beauty of the scenery was enough to wake the dead. We stopped for an early lunch where the owner treated us like we were Harry and Meghan. He made us a local drink of coffee called Pasado it was really good , We ran along the same river as yesterday and it was just as spectacular especially when the valley narrowed. Cliffs towered above us the river just below and more mountains on the other bank.

Eventually we turned off into the mountains for Chachapoyas our new base for the next few days. Again we ran alongside a river but as you might guess most of the roads in the mountains follow river valleys.

It is situated on a mountain top and is another Cuidad Blanco. The colonial section is really well preserved and mostly pedestrian. Google never factors that in. Walther a member of MAI and proud owner of a Ducati and a Harley said he would meet us and show us around. We had two dinners with him one in a restaurant specializing in the local cusine and the other in a barrio that we would never have found without the recommendation of the hotel owner. Both were great and he is a very interesting guy, a young doctor doing an internship there.

The main reason we were here was to visit Kuelap. It is a pre Inca site on top of a mountain, surprise, surprise. We joined a guided tour as we had heard conflicting road reports. The location is spectacular, whom ever chose it had a good eye for real estate. It was very interesting and the guide was very knowledgeable and had the ability to explain it well. It was a day well spent and I glad we did it with a group and guide.

Walther arranged for us to meet his moto club that night, after letting him drive Pferdi around town. (He was better than most first timers.) We met up at a plaza and then it was off to dinner. They wanted to go somewhere outside of town, unfortunately the front brakes stuck and overheated. After a quick roadside repair, I’ve had a lot of practice at this, it was back to town and bbq pollo place.

After dinner there was more socializing, courtesy of 2 local kids who were all over Pferdi while their parents waited for a taxi. At first I think that they thought I was upset that they were on the bike without permission but a few stickers and photos later it was all smiles.

We stayed an extra day so I could give the brakes a good inspection and clean. The dusty roads are one of the main culprits and as there was mountains as for as the eye could see it seemed like a good idea.

Leimebamba was the next stop, it is a small village with a well-known museum. In the 70’s a tomb site in the mountains was discovered and excavated. It was small but had some very interesting displays. The usual gold and beaded artifacts and the one Yvonne liked best a dried possum skin made into a handbag. Gucci doesn’t have anything like that yet. The most numerous items were mummies; they were placed in a fetal position but sitting then covered in wrappings. I don’t know whether they mummified naturally due to the dry air or were treated. It is a strange sight to see 20 or 30 mummies sitting in a room. It was a very interesting museum and unexpectedly good for a small village. There is so much history around this area that you could spend months exploring it.

Our little hotel overlooked the plaza where Pferdi was parked. We weren’t worried as the cop shop was right there as well. We did see 2 French women who were cycling the same route as us. Good luck to them with all those mountains and no villages to stop in.

Our plan was to drive to Cajamarca and then follow the 3n south. The first leg was to Celendin just a 140k away. Walther had told us about this stage. It is a single lane road but 2 way that goes over 2 sets of mountains. In the entire 140k no more than 3k was flat. Climbing out of Leimebamba it was green and steep and once you started the descent into the next valley it turned dry and deserty and got hotter and hotter. There was nowhere to stop on the downhill and the jackets had to stay on. Boy we were cooked at the bottom. Then a flat bit, actually it was the bridge across the river and then immediately the climb began again. At least we had got over the first mountains. Now to do it all over again.

Up to this point we had met very little traffic, the joys of another Sunday drive. Far up ahead I could see a truck and I knew we would have to deal with it sometime. Eventually we caught up to it and there was no room to squeeze by. After a few k’s we got a chance and I took it. I felt a bit Rossi like as I dived up the inside. Another truck loomed ahead, trucks here carry both passengers and cargo. The passengers sit on the cargo so as you follow one there are always waves and photos. Then another truck came the other way. I am not too sure how they work out who reverses but thankfully it wasn’t us. The other guy carefully backed up around a corner and came to a slightly wider spot and stopped. No f*cking way he’ll get passed I thought but he did, at one point the outer dually was over the edge. There is no way I would drive anything bigger than Pferdi on that road but these guys do it and handle with aplomb. Our truck let me passed at the next opportunity.

The long grind continued the scenery was beautiful the few quick glances I got of it. One of my best memories is of a Mum and her little boy. She was w@$#ing the dishes in the stream on the side of the road and he was splashing about until he saw the bike and then he just froze in disbelieve. We must have looked like aliens dressed in black with full face helmets and dark visors. It could have been a flying saucer as far as he was concerned. I watched him in the mirror until we went around a corner. I will never forget the look on his face.

Finally it was over the second pass , (3300m), and the final descent into Celendin. 140k in 5 hours and got into 3 gear twice, once leaving Lemembamba and at the bottom of the grade in Celendin. What a day.

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Lokiboy
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Re: The big trip

Post by Lokiboy » Sat Apr 18, 2020 10:02 pm

Wow! What an update. Thanks so much. I envy you two because I would never have the courage to take on such an awsome venture (and this coming from a world-wide traveled USAF dude).

Can’t wait for the next update. As winter is approaching down there I hope it doesn’t impede your progress.
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Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Sun Apr 19, 2020 10:05 am

Lokiboy, as I explained in my previous post of a few days ago we are under lockdown here until 4/26. Thanks for the comment and all of you take care and stay safe.

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Re: The big trip

Post by Peter Pan » Mon Apr 20, 2020 11:19 am

So that is the reason you finally type something yourself...
Lockdown with slight relieve in the week in CR too.
Yvone and Fran, don't get cabin fever... Flory and I "enjoy" the less then 3 miles between the 2 houses as excuse to escape. There was not much further entertainment the last 5 weeks.
Racing Richard P still waits for the next grandson... while Rick C + Maricela still stay in their farm for some time more and left out the repatriation action of the embassy. Possibly they stay safer here then in NC.
Best wishes from dry and hot Costa Rica.
Sven
Sophie Travelair = Patrol 2013
8 weeks 12.000km Oregon-Alaska-Oregon
With a DIY foam air filter the rig runs well even in tropical rain = :moto:
Final drives: 1. at 5000km, 2. at 34.000km(+friction plates) 3. at 42.386km
transmission: 1. 40.000km. 2. installed
Engine: 1. 43.388km crank replacement: Back on the road since 23.Okt.2019 :party:

The Avatar are 2 rice grains stating life's essence:
"The most important you cannot see!"
=> Attitude makes the difference!

Fran
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Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Wed Apr 22, 2020 11:52 am

Hi all,
I am writing to you all to ask if you are thinking of making a Corona virus-related donation, could you include my old, but young, Spanish teacher, Magdelana and her family in your considerations.

Magdalena is 28 I think, and had a cancer operation in January. Her treatments are currently on hold due to the virus. She is Mayan, it is her first language but she teaches Spanish to tourists and her husband Antonio is a guide. Since there are no tourists now, they have no work and realistically speaking, the near future doesn’t hold much hope in that respect. They have 2 young children under 10, Marlene, who helped me with my reading at ‘skool’ and Panchito (Little Pancho/Francisco). I think their extended families have as little as they have. We used to buy bread from Magdalena’s 10 year old sister Chayita when she worked in the family bakery after school. She’d be there till 9 PM or later, doing her homework in between serving and when we asked once what time the shop closed, she answered “When the bread is gone!”

From what I understand there is no or just token help from the Guatemalan government. It seems the Mayan community has always, even in the best of times, last on the list.

We having been trying to help them for the past while, but things are going from bad to worse by the day. They are now in the position of not being able to afford the basic necessities not to mention her medicines.

I know the present situation is hard for all of us but we can at least put food on the table. Not everyone is so lucky. I’m not asking for an immediate donation, I just wanted to mention this family in the event you decide at some time to give to a charitable organization. Giving directly to this family would have an immediate effect.

If you can help I know they would be very grateful. Nothing will be too small an amount and it goes directly to them. If you are interested, PM me and I will figure out the logistics.

Thanks and you all stay safe,
F&Y

Fran
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Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2017 9:06 pm

Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Thu Apr 23, 2020 2:15 pm

For any of you who are able to help Magdelana and her family here is a link to the Gofundme page I set up.
https://www.gofundme.com/f/guatemala-family-assist
Thanks for any help you can give them.

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Peter Pan
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2020
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2020
Posts: 3702
Joined: Fri Jan 31, 2014 11:30 pm
Location: Heredia, Costa Rica/new speed record 115kmh by son

Re: The big trip

Post by Peter Pan » Thu Apr 23, 2020 2:37 pm

Flory's former Spanish priest would say now:
"¡Que no suene, que no suene!"

On, On Fran.
Sophie Travelair = Patrol 2013
8 weeks 12.000km Oregon-Alaska-Oregon
With a DIY foam air filter the rig runs well even in tropical rain = :moto:
Final drives: 1. at 5000km, 2. at 34.000km(+friction plates) 3. at 42.386km
transmission: 1. 40.000km. 2. installed
Engine: 1. 43.388km crank replacement: Back on the road since 23.Okt.2019 :party:

The Avatar are 2 rice grains stating life's essence:
"The most important you cannot see!"
=> Attitude makes the difference!

Fran
Party Member
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Posts: 206
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2017 9:06 pm

Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Fri Apr 24, 2020 12:23 pm

Thank you Peter Pan and Manscout for helping Magdelana and her family.

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Peter Pan
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2020
Hero of the Soviet Union - 2020
Posts: 3702
Joined: Fri Jan 31, 2014 11:30 pm
Location: Heredia, Costa Rica/new speed record 115kmh by son

Re: The big trip

Post by Peter Pan » Fri Apr 24, 2020 2:10 pm

Fran, put it high your idea and publish it in all your blogs/forums.
good idea, go for it.
https://www.gofundme.com/f/guatemala-family-assist
Sophie Travelair = Patrol 2013
8 weeks 12.000km Oregon-Alaska-Oregon
With a DIY foam air filter the rig runs well even in tropical rain = :moto:
Final drives: 1. at 5000km, 2. at 34.000km(+friction plates) 3. at 42.386km
transmission: 1. 40.000km. 2. installed
Engine: 1. 43.388km crank replacement: Back on the road since 23.Okt.2019 :party:

The Avatar are 2 rice grains stating life's essence:
"The most important you cannot see!"
=> Attitude makes the difference!

Fran
Party Member
Party Member
Posts: 206
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2017 9:06 pm

Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Thu Jun 11, 2020 2:11 pm

Here is Yvonne's latest post.
[url]https://fyoconnor.wixsite.com/nofixedabode/blog[/url]
Stay safe.

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