The big trip

Where have you been riding? Tell us all about your trip. Prove it with pictures! If ya didn't take pictures, it didn't happen...
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Peter Pan
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Re: The big trip

Post by Peter Pan » Thu Oct 24, 2019 2:09 pm

Yvonne and Fran,
Sophie is back on the road since yesterday night!
Sophie Travelair = Patrol 2013
8 weeks 12.000km Oregon-Alaska-Oregon
With a DIY foam air filter the rig runs well even in tropical rain = :moto:
Final drives: 1. at 5000km, 2. at 34.000km(+friction plates) 3. at 42.386km
transmission: 1. 40.000km. 2. installed
Engine: 1. 43.388km crank replacement: Back on the road since 23.Okt.2019 :party:

The Avatar are 2 rice grains stating life's essence:
"The most important you cannot see!"
=> Attitude makes the difference!

Fran
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Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Tue Oct 29, 2019 5:08 pm

I need help again. It looks like I need an alignment also the side car wheel has a problem. It is about 5 degrees off vertical, looking from the front the bottom of the wheel is out and it leans in to the top. The wheel feels solid and the spokes are good and the strange thing is the handling is still not to bad. It definitely looks wrong and the tire wear is all on the inside of the tire. The plan is to try and find a hotel with a level parking lot and eyeball the alignment. Not sure what is the cause of the sidecar problem is all suggestions are welcome. Obviously when the bike is fully loaded the problem is worse. All help and suggestions are much appreciated. Thanks

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Peter Pan
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Re: The big trip

Post by Peter Pan » Wed Oct 30, 2019 12:23 pm

Hello Yvonne and Fran,
Sidecar wheel intentionally leaning to the left for our driven sidecars GU/Patrol. That way you stay with practically straight toe in (only 5/16" to 3/8" or so) and the rig still tracks straight. The wear on back wheel and sidecar wheel is at least on Sophie and most others I could observe a bit more on the inside then on the outside by nature.
Sophie never got her alignment adjusted and I marked the joints with centre point marks still at Racewayservices at delivery. These marks are still spot on.
Don't worry be happy.

Look instead for wear in wheel bearings and their seats and distance tubes.
(This week we checked the Enduro of the Canadian missionary you might remember,... 2 bearings later (grade C3=more air), a retouch of the distance tube on the surface grinder and handling changed 100 % for good.)

Only point that might have got some twist is the mounting plate of the final drive on the back swing of the bike. My final drive support was twisted over time and needed a fill up with washers (and epoxi).... Without back wheel, if the back axle has to be driven into the final drive and doesn't go in easily straight by hand, then it gets time to do it. Sophie had a wedge of about 1,6mm.

Best regards from Flory and family.
Sven
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Sophie Travelair = Patrol 2013
8 weeks 12.000km Oregon-Alaska-Oregon
With a DIY foam air filter the rig runs well even in tropical rain = :moto:
Final drives: 1. at 5000km, 2. at 34.000km(+friction plates) 3. at 42.386km
transmission: 1. 40.000km. 2. installed
Engine: 1. 43.388km crank replacement: Back on the road since 23.Okt.2019 :party:

The Avatar are 2 rice grains stating life's essence:
"The most important you cannot see!"
=> Attitude makes the difference!

Fran
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Posts: 176
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2017 9:06 pm

Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Thu Oct 31, 2019 5:52 pm

First of all thank you all again for your help and suggestions. We finally got a hotel with a flat parking lot. I had a look at the bike when it was unloaded and the camber was not as bad as it seemed when I checked it a few days ago. I had also experimented with a new loading plan. I think the problem was a combination of a number of small items. I found a buckle in the sidecar wheel ( I will need advice on that). 1) More weight than before in the car.
2) Some spring sag in the sidecar suspension. 3) Checking the caber on uneven ground. 4)The buckle might have made it seem worse. I went over every weld, nut and bolt wheel bearings etc. today. Over 3 hours just checking the 'car chassis. Everything is rock solid and safe which is the main thing.
I also stiffened the suspension a notch, it is 1 below max stiffness now. Now sure if that will help. I will go back to the old loading plan and see what difference that will make. Now the buckle, I got the wheel off the ground and using an old tile I found as a straight edge I rotated the wheel. As best I as I can tell the buckle is about .25 to.5 of an inch. I had a problem with lose spokes recently and when I had it worked on this must of happened. I have always been told truing a wheel is more of an art than science so have avoided trying it before. Any advice put there bear in mind that I am doing this in the field with only what I have on the bike. My instincts are to leave it alone and try to find someone here who can do it right. Any thoughts? Again many thanks for all your time and advice it really helped

Fran
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Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:37 pm

Better late than never. More to follow shortly.
We landed in Turbo on the 4th of June a new continent and in a strange way the beginning of the end. Even though we don’t think we will get to Tierra del Fuego before December 2020 we are on the final land mass.

Turbo would not be on my list of places to return to. We couldn’t land at the coast guard dock so the bikes were loaded into a small landing craft. It was normally used for transporting cattle thankfully it had been cleaned. There was plenty of room for all of us, 4 bmers, 3 dtrs and a klr. After disembarking at the cattle ranch we met our guide to take us to the customs office. On the way we got stopped at an insurance checkpoint and our guide disappeared. Guess he didn’t have insurance. With the help of some one’s GPS we made it but not before the muddy streets claimed some victims. As one of the bikes slid out it brushed the side of a new car and left some minor damage. A quick call to a local bodyshop a photo of the damage and the quote came back. $40 later everyone was happy and so onto customs.

Not only customs stay open through lunch but they processed 9 bikes and 10 people in a little over 2 hours. It was worth losing the guide and surviving the streets for that service. At the exit to the Navy base where customs was we split up with most heading north but ourselves and Marvin heading South. His destination was Cali and ours was Medellin. We decided to stay about 40k south of Turbo in a town on the main highway so as to get a fast start in the morning.

Oh the luxury of a hot shower and a cold rinse to w@$# away the salt and grime of the last few days. Don’t get me wrong the Stalleratte was a brilliant experience but so was the shower. Over dinner and a few beers we swapped stories and travel plans. Marvin was in management in the Hard Rock casino in Lake Tahoe. They had new owners and he didn’t like his new boss so he thought screw this I'll drive to Argentina. So he handed in his notice, got another bike, his Guzzi wasn’t right and headed South. He wasn’t sure if it was an excuse just to buy another bike or he really was saying f**k it to the corporate world forever but he was having an adventure. The next morning he headed for Cali at a rate of knots we could never match.

We had a small apartment in Medellin booked where we planned to wait the 10 days before friends arrived from CA. The usual pottering around followed. It is known for its perfect climate and is not like it was in the old days, very safe and secure with a great transport system. Botero the famous sculpture is a native of the city and in the main plaza downtown there are many of his pieces. I had never seen his sculpture before and it is brilliant especially to see it as part of the cityscape and people’s lives. In another smaller plaza there are more including one which a bomb was placed beside killing 20+ people. The piece was damaged but instead of repairing it Botero insisted on leaving it the way it was. It is a surprisingly moving monument to all the victims of the drug violence.

After doing the tourist things and finding a place to keep the bike we headed for the coast with the Krolles. It was a short flight on a commuter turbo prop. There are no roads to the coast except to one town. After landing in Bahia Solana it was a 2 hour boat ride to the house we had rented. It wasn’t a fun ride, a flat bottomed boat choppy seas and high speed are not contusive to comfort. We all made it a little battered but the surroundings soon made us forget it.

A lush green jungle came right down to the beach. Our house was on the beach in a small clearing. It consisted of 2 platforms with a bedroom upstairs and 2 down stairs. Everything was open no glass in the windows no other rooms except for the bedrooms. It had no power, internet and very sporadic phone service. It’s as far off the grid as we have been for a long time. We had brought some supplies with us beans, pasta, rice, garlic, eggs and of course cerveca. I can’t remember what we ate that first night, but I do remember it was delicious. Being the tropics it was dark very early and we watched the lighting over the jungle as we talked long into the night.

The local shop was a 30 minute walk down the coast, a combination of beach and jungle path. We did it every day as the beer and food didn’t last long. Carrying back more than a day’s supply of stuff was not easy, especially as this is one of the wettest places on the planet. The path had some spots where you could have lost an 18 wheeler in the mud. Luckily the closest we came to that was when Greta nearly lost one of her flip flops in a mud hole. The state of the tide was an important factor as when it was in we were cut off from anywhere. It was all very jolly explorer.

The week flew by in a mix swimming, shop trips, trying to find new ways to cook beans. After the second day the tienda had basically beans, rice, beer and Noelle crackers, a very bad cracker with a Santa on the pack. Not even eggs until the supply boat arrived the next week. Still we survived the last four days on beans rice and some fish as I have said before “no suffering, no legend”.

All too soon it was time to head back, the return boat journey was much smoother and we saw a whale doing its thing, which was pretty cool way to end a great week. We had all seen whales before off Ventura but every time is special.

After the night in Bahia Solana best described by that police phrase “ nothing to see here move along” it was back to Medillen and then off to the coffee district for some RnR. It is beautiful there. The drive to the house was awful, constant road works and then to top it all of a 2 hour delay as they closed the road. That’s were Yvonne spotted the broken ubolt on the rear sidecar strut.

When the road reopened at 6pm it was getting dark and we still had a good ways to go. It was not fun. Between the crappy Ural headlight and my aging eyes it was hard to see at all, did I mention the tinted visor? We arrived at the house almost 4 hours later I was mentally and physically trashed but the Krolles had stocked up on beer and food. God bless ‘em. It was a great house with a pool and a shop nearby with stuff in it nearby. Oh the luxury of eggs, veg, vino for the ladies and a selection of beer, you don’t appreciate what you have until it’s gone. Much too soon we were all Bogata bound, our friends for the plane home and us for annual physical, teeth cleaning, new shoes and all the boring stuff the doesn’t miraculously go away when you live the dream.

Bogata traffic is famously bad, 2 hours for 15k as we came into town all because of some minor road works. Even without the road works it is not much better at any time. Finally we made to the hotel I was fried after the stress of the drive. Just as I was starting to unwind we got a text from Jimmy one of the Whats app group who take care of us. I will be there in the morning to take you to a shop and they can fix the ubolt. My plan was to weld a new threaded piece on. It turned out they couldn’t do it but suddenly this guy arrived and started talking to Jimmy, he had a shop around the corner and he could fix it.

Nelson made sidecars from the ground up, what are the odds? He dived into the box of bits and found a ubolt that fit. I had whacked the sidecar fender and cracked it so that came off and he welded it together. He didn’t want anything for all the work but finally he was persuaded to accept some cervase money. Less than 24 hours after arriving at the hotel the bike was fixed who would have predicted that? That was a huge weight off our minds.

Now all that was left was the doctor and dentist. We got a recommendation for a dentist and found a medico on google. We also needed some parts for the bike and the plan was to have a friend ship them from Calf. It turned out the Doc’s partner, a Cuban, knew a shipping company in Miami so the parts went back to Florida and then they sent them to us. Shipping costs Fl to CA $16 CA to FL $35 and FL to Bogota $25 next time I will order straight from Miami Ural who will ship them anywhere

While we were waiting for them we did some tourist things including going to Jimmy’s grandparents finca (farm). To avoid traffic we left at 6am on a Sunday morning and up the mountains we went. We were joined by his neighbor and 2 friends. It was only about 100k but it took almost 3 hours as the mountain roads are slow and we did stop for supplies (cervaza). The last 20k were unpaved up into this mountain valley. What a beautiful spot steep lush green mountains with a river down the valley floor it has to be one of the most beautiful places I have ever seen. His Uncle worked the farm and needed some of his crop brought to the pick-up spot. Pferdi had no problems with the two 50kilo bags of beans and soon we had them safely delivered. Then back to the finca for lunch followed by visiting other relatives of Jimmy’s that lived nearby. It being Sunday afternoon everyone was visiting each other. We were introduced around and given much encouragement to drink this homemade drink. It was made of a fruit mix and thankfully not too strong. It was brewed and served out of an old plastic container which went around many times. I had no idea drinking out of a gourd could such a nice way to spend a Sunday afternoon.

Back at the finca after many cervases it was time to turn in. It is amazing how easy it is to return to nature’s clock when there are no bright lights around. It is a case of early to bed early to rise. Jimmy had to be back for work at lunchtime so an early start was called for. It was on the way down the mountain I realized we had a problem with the rear wheel. Turns out one of the wheel bearings was shot.

I think I bitched about the spare wheel before being just extra weight. How wrong I was. I swapped out the spare for the rear without much problem. The rear disc was impossible to remove without an impact driver. Green f%*#ing locktite again. Why do they use that when blue is enough and it can be removed with normal tools?

Luckily there was a KTM dealer near the hotel and I brought the wheel to them and they got it off. Pferdi attracted a lot of attention outside and the story of our trip was told to many. The owner Santigo Pascal who had finished the Dakar in 2018 was promised a driving lesson as soon as the wheel was fixed. His English was perfect (he had gone to college in the US). He ordered the parts and was all apologies that they wouldn’t arrive until tomorrow, as it was now after 4pm and these were special orders no apologies were expected. But that is Columbians for you. They are some of the friendliest most hospitable people we have ever met. We were told shortly after we arrived if they invite you to stay the night or for a meal or whatever they mean it and it is not just words. How true that is.

Back at the hotel I put the disc on the ‘new’ rear wheel. Good thing the dealership was just down the road as driving around with the caliper strapped to the side box frame was a little too precarious for my taste. After picking up the parts it was time for the driving lesson. After explaining the basics it was off into the traffic. He did really well and didn’t scare me at all. (Not like some people). He drove around for about 15 mins before we got back to the shop. There were a few worried faces but they quickly turn to smiles when the boss returned safely. Asked by some of the spectators what it was like I heard the words, muy dificil more than once. It made me feel good that a Dakar finisher thought we were doing something special.

Fran
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Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Wed Dec 04, 2019 3:44 pm

Here is a link to Yvonne's blog

Code: Select all

https://fyoconnor.wixsite.com/nofixedabode

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Wildhorse Cafe
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Re: The big trip

Post by Wildhorse Cafe » Wed Dec 04, 2019 6:01 pm

"Love in the time of cholera", epic story.
2011 Patrol Higgs Bison Super Collider formally known as the Orange and Silver Pumpkin Coach.

2013 Black Retro, my name is nobody.

When you set out on your journey to Ithaca
pray the road is long , full of adventure, full of knowledge
not expecting that Ithaca will offer you riches
Ithaca has given you the beautiful voyage

C.P. Cavafy

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Mr Wazzock
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Re: The big trip

Post by Mr Wazzock » Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:19 pm

Epic. I think the "green Loctite" might be corrosion in the alloy adapter screw holes. :o
Mike H
2016 Ural cT, in glorious terracotta
(aka Oranzhevaya Opasnost, "The Orange Peril")

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Lokiboy
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Re: The big trip

Post by Lokiboy » Wed Dec 04, 2019 8:22 pm

Now that is an update! It’s fantastic the support along the route, the friendly folks you’ve met, and the adventures you’ve shared with us. Thanks.
2011 Gear Up - "Erika"
Yorktown, VA

Mains: 127, Idle: 40, Needle: 1 shim
MKIII air filter
100,000 km and counting

Fran
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Re: The big trip

Post by Fran » Mon Dec 09, 2019 9:31 am

This is just a collection of random memories from Columbia. It is no particular sequence just as they come to mind.

Taking the Stahleratte from Panama to Turbo was one of the highlights so far. Loading the bike from the dock, I couldn’t watch as Pferdi swung out over the water and on to the deck. The day spent in the San Blas islands. They are small islands with coconut palm trees, white beaches, palm huts with hammocks which reminded me of the Corona beer ads but more perfect. Myself and Yvonne spent the day swimming, pottering around different islands, sitting on the deck and generally just whiling away a perfect day. On the night cruise to the Columbia border port we sat on deck with the Southern Cross on the starboard and the Plough to port. I didn’t know you could see both at the same time. As we cruised parallel to the coast of the Darrien Gap a continuous lighting storm lite up the land. Waking up early the next morning I went on deck where it was just me and the captain, for once it was good to be an insomniac. Over there he pointed is where the Scottish tried to set up a colony and build a road across the isthmus back in the day. Needless to say it wasn’t a huge success.

Our first real day in Columbia, on the road to Meddilln, our jaws kept dropping from the sheer beauty of the scenery. It seemed around every corner it just got better. The road alternated between over mountains and through deep valleys. All the time we were either looking down into valleys or up at mountains and the mountains are steep. Missing a turn is not an option. Everywhere was a lush green, that if you saw in a picture you would think “photo shop”.

In general the main roads in Columbia are good but the amount of road works is amazing. Obviously the money they are not spending fight narcos and the Farc, etc. is now being spent on the roads. It is accepted practice here that bikes go to the front of the line so it is a good way to pass the cars and trucks safely on mountain roads. It would be nice to come back in 2 or 3 years’ time and enjoy the benefits of all the work.

Guatape is a town outside of Medillin which we went to for a few days. As we left the main highway and stopped to get gas a major UDF (Ural delay moment) started. We must have been at the station close to an hour, we met everyone there, staff, vendors, customers, restaurant customers, passersby you get the picture. Many photos, greetings and thanks for visiting our country later we were treated to a fruit drink which was fantastic and I don’t usually like fruit. Our story was told and repeated and repeated again. It is true what we had been told Columbians are incredibly friendly and hugely proud of their country.

Exploring around Guatape one day I noticed I red Cherokee driving behind they kept pace with us no matter what speed we did. Oh fertilizer I thought this could be bad, then I noticed they had a TV camera pointing at us through the windshield. Now I had to put on a bit of a show. The speed went up the corners got better and I tried to look as cool as possible. You have to give it your best for your public.

We met the TV boys again in the plaza of the next town. We had just finished a coffee, 30 cents for 2 cups. This was some of the best coffee around not like Starbucks sludge. Come join us at the river they said. we are hanging out and having a BBQ. You can’t refuse an invitation like that. We had a great time they were 4 young guys freelancing I would guess and enjoying themselves. One interview was done with the interviewer wearing a face mask, snorkel and flippers. You had to be there for it to make sense. Rides were filmed from the sidecar and a drone etc. every angle was covered. A great time was had by all, laughs are the same anywhere in the world All too soon it was time to go before it got dark, and to think my first thought on seeing this guys this morning was this could be bad. How wrong I was. Thanks guys for a fantastic day.

Villa de Yeyva is about 2/3 hours outside of Bogota with the largest plaza in Columbia or maybe South America. It was a hot Sunday afternoon when we arrived. I always say any fool can get to within a couple of k’s of their destination it the last bit that is the hardest. After driving around for a while looking for the accommodations nerves were a little tight. It was only supposed to be 600ft from the plaza. We were stopped at the plaza having as a friend once described it a vigorous domestic debate when someone walked up. I’ve seen that tee shirt before, I though, it was Olaf who we met in Costa Rica. I have to admit it was only the tee shirt I recognized at first. He introduced us to his new travelling companion Jonas from Belgium. The vigorous debate was quickly put aside and we all agreed to meet for beers later at 4pm. Hotel found and showered, cleaned and acting like the mature adults we went forth to meet the boys. It was a long and fun night. Jonas had seen Pferdi in Costa Rica but couldn’t afford to stop at our place. Olaf and Jonas are on a strict budget but that was out the window tonight.

We sent the next few days together exploring, doing the tourist thing, drinking beer and generally having fun. All too soon they needed to head on, both of them had enough of the heat and were looking forward to Bogota and we who had spent a few weeks there wanted heat.

Lago de Tota is the biggest lake in Columbia and has the most beautiful white beach. We had seen photos and added it to the agenda. It was bloody freezing as it is at 3000m and when we arrived cloudy and windy. A bit of a surprise and the hotel was not geared for the cold. No hot water and when we went out to get dinner we had a choice of 2 restaurants both empty and chilly. Oh the glamour of travel.

We decided to drive around the lake. The beach was beautiful but we needed our bike jackets as the wind blew constantly. It warmed up a little and we had an interesting drive. This was not the usual visitor route this was real life. It looked like small farms split between cattle and onions was the basis of the non- tourist economy. Like all resorts in the off season it was not at its best and we were glad we had only decided to stay 2 days.

Barichara is a colonial town that is perched on top of a mountain. It is almost perfectly preserved and is more of a large village than town. The view over the valley from the mirador was spectacular. Listening to local Columbian salsa music, for once at a reasonable volume, drinking great coffee while enjoying the scenery, I’m not sure how you could improve that moment. There is a nice hike from there to a village called Guane it was 8k along the old trade trails between the villages. These routes date back to time immemorial. We left early to beat the heat and any tours buses that were due to visit Guane. What a great walk, the trail had dry stone walls on both sides and was wide enough for pack animals to pass each other easily. It was impossible not to think about the people who had organized, built and used this trail before we walked it. These were the freeways of their time.
Mompos was along a river and the amount of insects flying around the lights at night was amazing. You know you are in trouble when you are handed a whisk as soon as you sit down. The last 30k of the road there was like something out of WW1. A series of what I think shell holes look like joined together by ribbon of ancient tarmac. By the time we negotiated that we were tired, shagged out and bloody hot.

Food choices were not great and it never really cooled down at night. After a few days we had enough of being eaten at night and cooking during the day. It was time to move on.

On the way from Mompos to Carthagena we had to take a ferry. It was a 2 hour wait for the big ferry with the cars and trucks. Finally we got loaded last on but first off. The ferry captain asked me for the fare and I explained to him, no tengo dinero porque tengo una esposa. I have no clue where that came from I couldn’t have said that if I tried to think it out. Knowing looks all around. The trip took about 2 hours down a river, it was hot and humid but when we disembarked it was back on the good roads all the way to Carthenga.

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Mr Wazzock
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Re: The big trip

Post by Mr Wazzock » Tue Dec 10, 2019 5:38 pm

:thumbsup: :)
Mike H
2016 Ural cT, in glorious terracotta
(aka Oranzhevaya Opasnost, "The Orange Peril")

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Mr Wazzock
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Re: The big trip

Post by Mr Wazzock » Tue Dec 10, 2019 5:43 pm

I agree about finding places, lost count how many times I've arrived somewhere, gone straight there no problem, now where's the farking camp site – backwards and forwards up and down roads trying to follow the instructions in the camping guide book – one time I couldn't see the name of the road (single track lane) because you can only see the sign coming from the opposite direction. :?

Lot easier now with Google street view, you can do a virtual drive plus aerial views and search for it that way
Mike H
2016 Ural cT, in glorious terracotta
(aka Oranzhevaya Opasnost, "The Orange Peril")

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