Motorcycle Ergonomics

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rougaroo
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Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by rougaroo » Mon Apr 27, 2020 11:56 am

Some of you may be familiar with this neat site: https://cycle-ergo.com/

Essentially, you put in your height and inseam measurement, and then it'll show your body position on various bikes. You can play with handlebar setback, handlebar risers, peg setback or rise, etc and your dummy will adjust superimposed on the bike(s) you pick. The only Ural in their database is a 2010-2011 solo.

This may be a great way to see whether some bike will have your knees up to your chest or have you leaning forward all day, or whether you might like xxx bike over yyy bike, but it really doesn't tell you much about "optimal" ergonomics, i.e. what adaptations might be best for you to adopt for your own body type and your style of riding.

We have pretty limited adjustment options on Urals. There isn't a lot of foot room, and though the pegs move, about half of their swing is limited by the cylinders. People have used risers on the handlebars and risers under the seat, and a couple of folks have spoken about setback on the handlebars. From what I've seen, most Uralistas ride sitting straight up, not leaning forward, which is great for hand circulation on longer rides but presents problems if you raise the seat too high. Raise the seat and you're raising the center of gravity on the bike, which can create a more tender balance problem on turns.

So, first, check out this site and input your numbers. They obviously need some more Ural data. But, second, within the limited scope of what we can do on a Ural, how have you adapted your bike to your own ergonomics for riding comfort?

When Van and I were brainstorming out at IMZ last year, I suggested that Ural offer three frames - small, medium, and large - based on the body size of the owner. The larger frames could be both taller and longer. When you think that the original design was for people who averaged 5'6" and 150lbs, it is no wonder we get sore.

Rougaroo
2003 Tourist - lotsa upgrades
2004 Troyka - work in progress

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Lmo
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by Lmo » Mon Apr 27, 2020 12:09 pm

Three different frames?

Ural doesn't have the budget to upgrade the transmission/final drive, let alone design, engineer, and manufacture three different frames.

But I feel your pain, literally. My Dnepr's ergo situation is horrible; I have to rest my right foot on the sidecar frame because there isn't room to slip it under the carburetor to rest on the footpeg.
Lew Morris
Dnepr w/ '06 Ural Drive Train
C5 Power Arc
125/42 jets
Drilled slides/
.030" shims

1973 BMW R75/5 (original owner)
1947 HD FL (long gone, forever regretful)

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Lofty
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by Lofty » Mon Apr 27, 2020 12:31 pm

rougaroo wrote:
Mon Apr 27, 2020 11:56 am
within the limited scope of what we can do on a Ural, how have you adapted your bike to your own ergonomics for riding comfort?
The OEM Enduro bench seat on my Gear Up provides me with the space I require to ride the bike in a reasonably comfortable manner. The addition of the ATV seat cover adds a bit of comfort to the builder-grade foam used in the seat itself.

The bike doesn't feel as cramped as its appearance (and my appearance whilst sitting on it) would suggest; that was a pleasant surprise. I find the factory handlebars to be satisfactory, too. Ergonomics are subjective.

A ride in the rain reveals where I sit, and by extension, the necessity of the bench seat on my rig.

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Inventory:
2018 Ural Gear Up
2015 Suzuki DR650
1991 Bianchi Osprey
1952 Columbia RX-5 ('87, NOS)

RC20
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by RC20 » Mon Apr 27, 2020 1:23 pm

Ural doesn't have the budget to upgrade the transmission/final drive, let alone design, engineer, and manufacture three different frames
They did, it just was not a slick Yahmi, Honda, Kawi etc upgrade. Works fine and I have no issue with it. From memory its about as good as the R80GS sans one less gear.

That said, from my cycle list you can see I always was an upright kind of guy (grin). For those now familiar, the Nighthawk S was a UJM type with outstanding performance with a shaft, red line was 10,500 and cutout 11,500. Fully upright. Call it the Upright version of a sport tourer before there were sport tourer.

That said, I never had any body issues with the ones I had and had good hopes for the Ural. I was not disappointed. I am fully comfortable on it. The Nighthawk S I tweaked the bars a bit (they did have some adjustment) the Ural I have not need to do so.

The rear brake lever is not well positioned but that about it.

I am not a poster child for long rides. I am 65+, overweight. (working on that) ruptured disk and some old injury issues. I put in some really long days on the Ural getting it back to AK. Not full time in the saddle but 12 hours from start to finish one day and 16.5 the last day going into Anchorage.

Only issue I had was an old pulled muscle under the shoulder blade, and that only ramped up because of the bad road up by the Ak border the last day of the trip.

Amazingly when I stopped for the day (and I camped each night) I was not beat up or hurting going to sleep nor stiff and beat up the next day. All I needed was a good mattress which I had (Lightstream 3 inch self inflate, as good as the very good mattress at home)
Fear No Gravel
Formerly Owned: ( various rides on others)
Honda 90
2 x CB750K (one a true Japan Model flown to Hawaii by a P3 Orion Sub Patrol Aircraft!)
1 x CB700 SC ala Shaft Drive Nighthawk S (RC20 is the actual in house production Model)
1 x R80GS (ok to start with, learned to love it for what it was)
1 x CB450K

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snowymonkey
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by snowymonkey » Mon Apr 27, 2020 2:09 pm

I’m 5-11 with a 30ish inch inseam (a little closer to 31), riding a 08 patrol with the stock stepped bench seat.

What I added / adjusted....

Handle bar risers

Sean’s steering dampener, which allowed me to remove the stock one completely...... which allowed me to flip my stock handle bar mounts 180 degrees. The combination of that and the risers brought everything up and back.

I shifted the foot pegs down a tooth. That’s as far as I could go with my stock pontoon style exhaust. Once I switch to the sportster pipes I’ll probably move it down a bit more. Had to cut out peg rubber for this mod, but it’s worth it.

Added a small windscreen and hand guards.... as well as leg guards.

Changed out my stock grips for some bmw style ones.

I’ve done a lot more.... but that’s most of my rider comfort stuff.


Mine is the black one, blue is my buddy George.
2481FD9F-BC4C-4F91-B482-767C82F4E42D.jpeg
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“ The music moves me, but it moves me ugly” - Nickoli

2008 Ural Patrol - “Toothless”

Lake City Florida

RC20
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by RC20 » Mon Apr 27, 2020 2:51 pm

I was just shy of 5'9" but with the back stuff its 5'8" now, maybe a bit less. Or I shrunk as I got older?

Inseam is 30 inch area.

Never had a cycle I did not put a fairing on, I don't see that as a fit/ergonomics issue as an operational one. I just never like the blast.

I am impressed with those that ride naked or small ones (the R80GS has a small one that I changed to a Rifle as soon as I could afford it) - even when I was 20 the 750s both got fairings as soon as I could fine one.
Fear No Gravel
Formerly Owned: ( various rides on others)
Honda 90
2 x CB750K (one a true Japan Model flown to Hawaii by a P3 Orion Sub Patrol Aircraft!)
1 x CB700 SC ala Shaft Drive Nighthawk S (RC20 is the actual in house production Model)
1 x R80GS (ok to start with, learned to love it for what it was)
1 x CB450K

Current:
1 x 2019 cT Terracotta

What I Did (I quit June 2 , 2019)
Mechanic/Technician/Engineer: Electro Mechanical Systems

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snowymonkey
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by snowymonkey » Mon Apr 27, 2020 3:04 pm

I’m the opposite down here in Florida. I want the wind in my face. I ride with a small one or none at all.
“ The music moves me, but it moves me ugly” - Nickoli

2008 Ural Patrol - “Toothless”

Lake City Florida

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Peter Pan
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by Peter Pan » Mon Apr 27, 2020 3:41 pm

The first 12.00km I went withthe original Patrol-step bench... didn't know where to locate my shins...always hit carbs and air ducts. The handlebar i needed to move only a few mm backwards and surprise suddenly this odd handlebar does make sense.
Once I got the spring saddle (Jim called it the Deluxe saddle") I moved it one set of holes backwards (1,5"?) and there it stays well. There o¡was one thing totally indecipherable to me. The brake pedal.... 3 inches too far back... 3 Inches and a wedge added... an little filing and now even the drums have some bite.
(needed in mountain range.)

As Jim said. it is not the bike that gets adjusted to the rider. It is the rider who has to mold to the Ural.
Sophie Travelair = Patrol 2013
8 weeks 12.000km Oregon-Alaska-Oregon
With a DIY foam air filter the rig runs well even in tropical rain = :moto:
Final drives: 1. at 5000km, 2. at 34.000km(+friction plates) 3. at 42.386km
transmission: 1. 40.000km. 2. installed
Engine: 1. 43.388km crank replacement: Back on the road since 23.Okt.2019 :party:

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"The most important you cannot see!"
=> Attitude makes the difference!

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snowymonkey
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by snowymonkey » Mon Apr 27, 2020 3:53 pm

Peter Pan wrote:
Mon Apr 27, 2020 3:41 pm
As Jim said. it is not the bike that gets adjusted to the rider. It is the rider who has to mold to the Ural.
More true words have never been spoken :cheers:
“ The music moves me, but it moves me ugly” - Nickoli

2008 Ural Patrol - “Toothless”

Lake City Florida

Marine Corps Codu
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by Marine Corps Codu » Mon Apr 27, 2020 4:49 pm

Peter Pan wrote:
Mon Apr 27, 2020 3:41 pm
The first 12.00km I went withthe original Patrol-step bench... didn't know where to locate my shins...always hit carbs and air ducts. The handlebar i needed to move only a few mm backwards and surprise suddenly this odd handlebar does make sense.
Once I got the spring saddle (Jim called it the Deluxe saddle") I moved it one set of holes backwards (1,5"?) and there it stays well. There o¡was one thing totally indecipherable to me. The brake pedal.... 3 inches too far back... 3 Inches and a wedge added... an little filing and now even the drums have some bite.
(needed in mountain range.)

As Jim said. it is not the bike that gets adjusted to the rider. It is the rider who has to mold to the Ural.
Sven,
I. like many, learned a LOT from Jim.
Hope you are doing well.
Keith
Keith Birkhofer
Marine By Choice
Current 2018 Gear Up
Former Bikes:
1947 Cushman Motor Scooter
1958 Cushman/Sears Motor Scooter
1964 Yamaguchi
1965 Honda 250
1968 KZ1000
1960 Honda 55 (2 of them)
2002 Honda Gold Wing GL1800
2006 Ural Patrol
2005 BMW R1200GS
2018 Ural Gear Up

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Speedbump
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by Speedbump » Mon Apr 27, 2020 4:50 pm

I added 5" bar risers to some MX bars that are more strait across then stock and set them at 45deg.
20180218_111628.jpg
Added a HD solo seat.
20190519_115438.jpg
But the first thing I did was to cut off and weld the rear brake pedal to a position so my right foot would be on the peg.
20160524_111228.jpg


Been confortable :lol: ever since.
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Peter Pan
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by Peter Pan » Tue Apr 28, 2020 12:10 pm

Since the MZ and Jawa rig, the Ural is just a logical continuation of lesson learned from supposed to be communist Warschauer Pact motorcycle producers.
Only to fullfill the "5 years plan" is important. Ergonomics or quality are not needed. If at all they are pure result of causality.

Snowmonkey, too many flowers. We all must be masochists to have bought these bikes.
Once upon the time I had a button, that would drive the department clerk nuts:
"I am always in trouble,
but it is so much fun!"
Only in this context someone can choose a Ural as first ride. :P

China continues in this fashion. Mrs Merkel didn't want to praise the chineese "humanitarian help shipment":
11 Million out of 11 Million face masks were junk....
As far I know were discarted right out of the container.

Speedbump, you got it. first take care for the most important 4 letter sensor.

Keith, thanks for asking. Family ok, cabin fever a bit lowered since the boss and I switched houses with the kids... Now they herd cat and miniture boxer (Boston Terrier) and we get herded by daughter's shepherds. While i make experiments. (Want to build a "broomstick pump" with tire tubes, inspirated by a "Lambach"pump. (check Wikipedia)
Best regards
Sven
Sophie Travelair = Patrol 2013
8 weeks 12.000km Oregon-Alaska-Oregon
With a DIY foam air filter the rig runs well even in tropical rain = :moto:
Final drives: 1. at 5000km, 2. at 34.000km(+friction plates) 3. at 42.386km
transmission: 1. 40.000km. 2. installed
Engine: 1. 43.388km crank replacement: Back on the road since 23.Okt.2019 :party:

The Avatar are 2 rice grains stating life's essence:
"The most important you cannot see!"
=> Attitude makes the difference!

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Happytrails
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Re: Motorcycle Ergonomics

Post by Happytrails » Tue Apr 28, 2020 12:44 pm

I'm 5'11" as well, seating position is ok for me. I'm pull forward a little which is fine. Glad I have the bench seat so I can shift back if I want to. Its a pretty neutral fitting bike for me and it wasn't hard to get used to the position. Those of you that can ride these for hours amaze me. I am good for maybe 2 1/2-3 hrs and thats it. The firm ride just gets to me.

The best ergo things I've done so far are the fairing/windshield and a rear brake pedal riser. :)
-JR

2018 Ural GearUp, Urban Camo
1991 Honda Goldwing SE

"riding is good therapy"

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